Screenshot 2016-03-06 13.00.19

21st Annual International Meeting on Microbial Genomes at Lake Arrowhead 9/18-22

Screenshot 2016-03-06 13.00.19

The meeting page for the 21st Annual International Meeting on Microbial Genomes at Lake Arrowhead is now up.  This has been one of my favorite meetings for many many years (full disclosure – I am now a co-organizer and have been for the last few meetings).  Note – the meeting is NOT just about genomes – it includes many related topics including just about anything about sequencing (e.g. microbiome studies) and/or microbial *omics.


This conference is part of a yearly meeting initiated in 1991 to bring together genome sequencers, bioinformatics specialists, biologists, and geneticists, to forge interactions that would result in meaningful functional genomics.  The goal of the meeting is to translate the influx of new genome sequencing information into useful biological studies.

The Lake Arrowhead 2016 meeting will have a major focus on microbial communities, the human microbiome, pathogens, and genome evolution.  The field of genomics has reached the point where deriving the sequence of an organism’s entire genome is now seen as a beginning rather than an endpoint.  The sequence itself is a powerful tool to guide further studies to achieve an understanding of the organism’s biology.  This understanding requires either a detailed genetic analysis, or more rapid methods for developing functional genomics.

Therefore, this years meeting will cover micro-organisms for which extensive analyses exist, and those for which new biological and technical strategies are being developed.  The focus on biodiversity, the human microbiome, pathogenic organisms, and bioenergentics adds special significance to this meeting.  This meeting is designed to have a mix of invited presentations and poster sessions.  The meeting will have approximately 150 participants.

Some details:

For information about past meetings see the following:

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Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. My lab is in the UC Davis Genome Center and I hold appointments in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology in the School of Medicine and the Department of Evolution and Ecology in the College of Biological Sciences. My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis (see my lab site here which has more information on lab activities).  In addition to research, I am heavily involved in the Open Access publishing and Open Science movements.