Postdoc and grad student Summit — preceding the EMBO Symposium on Aquatic Microeukaryotes

Apologies for the late notice on this .. but this may be of interest. Got this announcement a few days ago:

Colleagues —

Preceding this January’s EMBO Symposium on Aquatic Microeukaryotes in Heidelberg (January 26—29, 2016), the Marine Microbiology Initiative (MMI) is sponsoring a small two-day Summit for up to 24 postdoctoral fellows and advanced graduate students that will take place in Heidelberg on Sunday and Monday January 24—25, 2016. The goals of the Summit are to:

  1. To provide a relaxed setting for the presentation and discussion of exciting science at the frontiers of aquatic eukaryotic microbiology.
  2. To provide a forum for exploring career development issues.
  3. To inspire early-career scientists to have a voice at the following Symposium.
  4. To learn about EMBO, EMBL and MMI (e.g., via lab tours and information sessions).

Guest researchers who will also participate during one or both days include Ginger Armbrust (University of Washington), Eric Karsenti (EMBL Heidelberg), John Archibald (Summit lead organizer; Dalhousie University), Chris Bowler (École Normale Supérieure), Dave Caron (University of Southern California), Colomban de Vargas (Station Biologique de Roscoff), Sonya Dyhrman (Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University), Karin Rengefors (Lund University), and the MMI team (Adam Jones, Sara Bender, Kelly Canesi and me).

Information about the application process and travel subsidies are included in the attached form.

Step 1: Abstract submission for the Symposium at is due by October 22, 2015.

Step 2: The application deadline for the Summit is November 11, 2015 by email to Kelly Canesi (

See PDF of announcement here: EMBO_EMBL_postdoc_student_summit_app

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Jonathan Eisen

I am an evolutionary biologist and a Professor at U. C. Davis. My lab is in the UC Davis Genome Center and I hold appointments in the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology in the School of Medicine and the Department of Evolution and Ecology in the College of Biological Sciences. My research focuses on the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). To study this I focus on sequencing and analyzing genomes of organisms, especially microbes and using phylogenomic analysis (see my lab site here which has more information on lab activities).  In addition to research, I am heavily involved in the Open Access publishing and Open Science movements.